Microsoft Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V vs VMware – Part 1


I have decided to keep this as a running blog so I can add to it as I learn more about the Microsoft Hyper-V Virtualization platforms as they will contend fiercely with VMware for market share going forward.

I wonder. Is this VMware or Microsoft market to lose? Who is the leader here? Microsoft owns the OS and Client base, where as VMware owns the virtualization / hypervisor layer. From what I am reading and the info being released Microsoft has decided to get serious about Virtualization? Can VMware weather that storm? Should they even worry?

I have been a strong advocate of virtualization for several years. For most of those years, I have been a strong VMware advocate. Over the last year, I have been hearing more about how Microsoft is stepping up their game in regards to their virtualization platform. Better known as Microsoft HyperV.

I really thought VMware was getting serious about the enterprise when they decided to move away from just producing a hypervisor and virtualization platform to selling solutions which manage the actual infrastructure, applications and end user experience. Kudos for doing this. Being a” 1 trick pony” in today’s “Cloud World”, does not prove successful for many companies in IT. Here is the link to Vmware’s management solutions portfolio. http://www.vmware.com/solutions/virtualization-management/index.html.

It is safe to say VMware executives are not sitting back and letting Microsoft have their way. For the last few months,  VMware’s CTO Steve Herrod, has been evangelizing the Software Defined DataCenter (SDDC) http://bit.ly/LfbuHF

In my personal opinion.  I think Paul Maritz and Steve Herrod are 2 of the industry’s brightest IT visionaries. I believe Steve Herrod is one of IT’s brightest minds and speakers. He is my personal favorite. In some ways, I think they are too ahead in their thought process. Some of their ideologies are fantastic, but often leave you asking if the world is ready for all they preach about. If I had to say anything negative about VMware, it would be about their R&D and Sales Staff. This leads me to my research.

Why should VMware be afraid? When Microsoft decides to get serious about something, they go all the way. They have what it takes to develop a robust solution and market their HyperV platform. Let’s face it. Microsoft still owns the OS Market and their tools integrate rather well despite all the negative press they may get from the “haters”. Now of course there are a few battles Microsoft has yet to win, however we must recognize that although they show up fashionably late to many events, they do a great job of taking home the prize. Slow and steady has traditionally been Microsoft’s winning strategy.

A little history. Shall we go down the list?

Netscape – Internet Explorer “Browser Wars” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Browser_wars

Lotus Notes – Microsoft Exchange

Novell – Windows NT (that was an ugly one)

VMware – HyperV????

Could it be? Will Vmware fall to Microsoft tactics of giving their software away or bundling it with their OS? I took the time to read the following 24 page document. It clearly defines how Microsoft has come a long way and will give Vmware a run for their money. Yes it was published by Microsoft and will be Microsoft bias. I anxiously await VMware’s newest version of their Hypervisor platform so I can make a fair comparison.

For a quick overview of features comparison, here is a chart I found graciously put together by @microsoftnow at his blog site.

NOTE: To be fair to Vmware, the Mircorsoft Windows Server 2012 has not been released yet. Vmware has been tested and proven in today’s data center. We do not know what version of vSphere will be out by the time WS2012 is out.

System Resource Windows Server 2012 RC Hyper-V VMware ESXi 5.0 VMware vSphere 5.0 Enterprise Plus
Host Logical Processors

320

160

160

Physical Memory

4 TB

32 GB

2 TB

Virtual CPUs per host

2048

2048

2048

VM Virtual CPUs per VM

64

8

32

Memory per VM

1 TB

32 GB

1 TB

Active VMs per host

1024

512

512

Guest NUMA

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cluster Maximum nodes

64

N/A

32

Maximum VMs

4000

N/A

3000

Storage Virtual Fiber Channel

Yes

Yes

Yes

MPIO

Yes

No

Yes (VAMP)

Native 4-KB disk support

Yes

No

No

Maximum Virtual Disk Size

64 TB VHDX

2 TB VMDK

2 TB VMDK

Maximum pass through disk size

Varies

64 TB

64 TB

Offloaded Data Transfer

Yes

No

Yes (VAAI)

VDI* Hardware GPU to vGPU support

Yes

No

No

Software GPU support

Yes

Basic

Basic

Remote Touch Support

Yes

No

No

User Profile & Data Mgmt

Yes

No

No

Extensible Switch/Multi-tenancy

Extensible Network Switch

Yes

No

Yes

Confirmed Partner Extenstions

4

None

2

PVLAN

Yes

No

Yes

ARP/ND Spoofing Protection

Yes

No

vShield App/Partner

DHCP snooping/DHCP guard

Yes

No

vShield App/Partner

Virtual Port ACLs

Yes

No

vShield App/Partner

Trunk Mode to Virtual Machines

Yes

No

No

Port Monitoring

Yes

Per Port Group

Yes

Port Mirroring

Yes

Per Port Group

Yes

I want to acknowledge some of the resources I came across which made this blog possible.

http://www.milesconsultingcorp.com/Hyper-V-versus-VMware-Comparison.aspx

http://redmondmag.com/Articles/2012/03/01/Can-Microsoft-Live-up-to-the-HyperV.aspx?m=1&Page=2

http://communities.vmware.com/message/2054265

http://www.microsoftnow.com/2012/06/how-windows-server-2012-hyper-v-compares-against-vmware-vsphere-5-0-enterprise-plus.html

http://bit.ly/KZgcua – the Competitive Whitepaper

 

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